Seizing the Moment

I created a public service announcement for our most recent assignment in digital writing. I chose the topic of Epilepsy, seizures, and the basic process of first aid when a person has a seizure. I also included the circumstances that can make the situation more of an emergency, and when to call 911. This PSA is directed toward the general public for education, but also teaching first aid.

I was intimidated by the ability to choose any topic for this project, and at first chose Food Waste. However, shortly realized I was becoming frustrated because I could not fit it into one and a half minutes of my presentation. I then began thinking about other topics and areas that I could focus into a much smaller topic with the same impact of information.

After looking up various PSA topics on the internet, I thought about doing Epilepsy and Seizures. Epilepsy is a disorder that affects the nervous system and sometimes also known as a seizure disorder. People are usually diagnosed and use this term after having two seizures that were not caused by any medical condition. A seizure is a short period of electrical activity in the brain that is not a disorder itself. Seizures can be caused by many things.

Here are some statistics I have found for more information to understand epilepsy and seizures, and how prevalent it is in our society today. I could not fit this information into my PSA, but I feel this is supporting information and these statistics show more about epilepsy and seizures.

Seizures:

  • 300,000 people have their first convulsion each year.
  • 120,000 of them are under 18 years old.
  • Between 75,000-100,000 of them are under 5 years, and experienced a fever caused seizure.

Epilepsy:

  • 200,000 new cases of epilepsy are diagnosed each year.
  • 45,000 children under 15 develop epilepsy each year.
  • Males are slightly more likely to develop epilepsy then females.
  • In 70% of new cases, no cause is apparent.
  • By 20 years of age, 1% of the population can be expected to develop epilepsy.

I, like many people had never paid attention to seizure disorders until I had my first seizure at the age of 15, and another seizure at 20. I am now about to be 23, take seizure medication, and am still happily seizure free. People who have had seizures, including myself are usually on medication after the second one. I had no idea about seizures or what to tell people that were scared of someone having a seizure until I had mine. That is when I did some research on the types of seizures, and noticed more research needs to be done. It is hard for doctors to tell what the cause is, if there is a cause. The first questions people usually ask when they find out are, “What would I do if you have a seizure?” This is how I got the idea of explaining the disorder and seizures with first aid that was easy for the general public to understand.

The video itself was enjoyable to make because I used iMovie, and didn’t have any issues or complications with the program. I enjoy using iMovie because I was able to adjust each slide’s time, music, and picture just right for viewing and reading the slides. I wanted to make the video powerful without any audio, but use music and pictures. I used the instrumental version of We Are Young by Tonight with iMovie through iTunes. I included my PSA here.

Sources

www.epilepsyfoundation.org

www.epilepsy.com

2 thoughts on “Seizing the Moment

  1. Nice job, Lauren! I like that you labeled all your pictures–it really helped in showing how epilepsy can affect anyone, no matter what age, race, or gender. Great choice in music too–it was a good pace and fit the tone of your PSA. I also like how you ended on a positive note, inviting your audience to take action and learn ways to help people with epileptic seizures.

    1. Thank you! It took a while to search for a song with a beat that went with the theme, and I appreciate the compliment! Thank you, I thought that instructions on first aid could be most helpful after reading information about seizures.

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